My Areas of SpecialtyMy Specialties via TeleHealth

Welcome to my practice!  I work with adults in individual Cognitive Behavior Therapy to help alleviate symptoms of anxiety, depression, pain and insomnia as well as to increase positive health and well-being.

Summary

Welcome to my practice!  I work with adults in individual Cognitive Behavior Therapy to help alleviate symptoms of anxiety, depression, pain and insomnia as well as to increase positive health and well-being.

Introduction

As part of working together, you will learn more about the condition or goal you are interested in. Here, I briefly describe the areas in which I specialize, with links to more of my posts. If you’re interested in the types of psychotherapies I provide, go to Brief & Effective Therapies I use.

Anxiety

My Areas of Specialty 1Anxiety is a normal, common emotion. We all experience being scared of situations (like before surgery), worried about health, finances, or about what others think of us. Anxiety can even protect us from harm or motivate us to act.

However, 1 in 10 Americans suffer from too much anxiety. When it disrupts our quality of life or causes excessive physical or mental symptoms, it’s considered a disorder. The good news is that anxiety disorders can be treated with brief, structured, and effective methods.

Panic, Phobias, Generalized Anxiety, Worry 

Cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT) for most anxiety disorders usually employs 4 steps:

Education about anxiety helps you understand responses and teaches you more effective coping patterns.
Self-management skills for your body help you to relax, which can reduce physical symptoms.
Self-management skills for your mind help you to focus on alternative thinking styles.
Step-by-step behaviors to gradually expose you to fears, which enable you to regain more function.

For more on anxiety, check out:  CBT for Anxiety … CBT changes your brain … Mindfulness works!

 

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

IOCDF 2018: The BEST conference ... EVERWhen your unwanted thoughts occur repeatedly, you feel unable to stop them, or you feel the ONLY way to stop them is to repeat doing something excessively – to the point of distressing interference in a part of your life, it may be OCD.

The best proven treatment for OCD is a variation of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). It’s known as Exposure & Response Prevention (ERP), which I use primarily. I also tend to augment ERP with Acceptance & Commitment Therapy, another variation of CBT.

For more on OCD, check out:  Successes with OCD  … take a look at brain scans in CBT changes your brain … and the Community of IOCD

 

Depression

How we change our brain - in minutes 5

As with all other mental conditions, Depression is a brain disorder. Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) actually has been shown to change brain chemistry.

The first studies to prove how effective Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) was – done in the 1980’s – were conducted with people who were clinically Depressed.

Some people recover from Depression with CBT alone, without use of meds. Some prefer to use both CBT and medication. Either way, if you think you feel depressed, it’s treatable.

Check out more about CBT for Depression:  CBT for DepressionCBT changes your brain

 

Stress Management

 

Auto Draft 2Daily stress is unavoidable. What’s most important is how we manage it … so that it doesn’t manage us!  CBT offers the best skills training in how to manage your stressful thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.

In a few short stress management sessions, you will learn how to calm your body and mind to regain the control you need to live your best life. You will learn resilience skills and how to prevent falling back into old habits.

For more on Stress Management, check out:  Learning to Manage Stress …  The Best on Stress Management … and more posts here.

Insomnia/Sleep

CBT-I for Chronic Insomnia 1

It’s estimated that 1 out of 3 in the U.S. struggle with insomnia. Unfortunately, though the medical guidelines clearly state that the first line treatment is a behavioral one (CBT), too many still prescribe sleeping pills first (which don’t fix the problem).

As the behavioral sleep specialist for the Georgetown Sleep Disorders Center for more than 20 years, I’ve worked with so many – who not only have insomnia – but who are also hooked on sleeping pills. As well, many struggle with anxiety or depression … just because they haven’t been able to get a good night sleep in years!

For more on Insomnia or Sleep, check out:  CBT-I for InsomniaWhy I can’t sleep … and more posts here.

 

Chronic Pain

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Chronic pain affects nearly 100 million Americans and over 20 million experience it daily – with enormous distress and disability.  A great deal has been learned recently about chronic pain and how to treat it – including how much your distress can actually add to the pain.

If you have any kind of chronic pain, you owe it to yourself to watch this set of 15-minute videos which highlights the entire Stanford University Pain Management faculty discussing the various ways they both understand and treat chronic pain (including use of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for pain).

 

Fibromyalgia (FM)

FibromyalgiaFM is a chronic pain condition that increasingly is showing evidence of having a ‘brain signature’ in scans (not available for patients – yet). FM is difficult to live with, especially because it can include so many different symptoms that impact so many aspects of life.

I’ve worked with 100’s of people with FM in clinical research and in my practice, using CBT. Watch an excellent video, by a world leading Rheumatologist (and my former boss at the Chronic Pain & Fatigure Research Center), that explains FM and all the best practices for its treatment.

 

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Fibromyalgia & IBSIBS is a functional problem with the gut – meaning even though there is no tissue damage, the gut doesn’t work well. IBS can cause serious distress. People with it may tend to fall into a pattern of avoiding events and other activities that limits their quality of life.

CBT is a proven treatment for taking back the parts of your life that may get lost due to common pitfalls of IBS. U Penn Professor Hunt peels back the curtain and shows what Cognitive Behavior Therapy for IBS actually looks like in her video … in this post on IBS.

 

Optimism, Growth, & Well-Being

Learning Resilience Skills

Optimism may not come naturally to you. However, it is a ‘thinking style’ that can be learned and deployed at will. It’s proven to be related to better physical & mental health, longer life, and better performance.

Having a Growth Mindset may not come naturally to you. It too can be learned and deployed. As well, it’s proven to have significant life benefits.

If you’d like to cultivate having Well-Being, I’ve studied with the founder of the field of Positive Psychology and can share with you the proven strategies he and others have found to be associated with having a life well-lived.  For more details, see Positive Therapy.

Practice Location

About Dr. Cary 1My practice is located in Washington DC … walkable from Dupont Circle and Logan Circle … walkable from the Red Dupont Metro station and the Orange/Blue Faragut West station.

I am in a wheelchair accessible building and suite.

To schedule Friday & Saturday appointments, please contact me at DrCary@mac.com.

 

 

 

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Learning Resilience SkillsLearning Resilience Skills

Most people want to be happier, not just less depressed or anxious. I’ve studied with the founding scientist of Positive Psychology (and 'learned optimism'), Dr. Marty Seligman.

Overview

Anyone is eligible to take 1 or a series of courses online taught by Dr. Seligman and others. These courses translate the best of research on how to be more resilient, including the components of the U Penn resilience program:

Learning Resilience Skills 1

Downloaded at
https://ppc.sas.upenn.edu/resilience-programs/resilience-skill-set

Video Lectures by Scholars

Watch videos spanning the gamut of positive psychology (e.g., the science – and myths – of well-being, resilience, gratitude, love, happiness, compassion, hope, grit, growth mindset, wisdom, flow, self-control, creativity & aging) by the following thought leaders:

  • Christopher Peterson
  • Martin E.P. Seligman
  • Angela Duckworth
  • Tal Ben-Shahar
  • Barry Schwartz
  • Ed Diener
  • Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
  • Barbara Fredrickson
  • Roy Baumeister
  • Robert Emmons
  • Shane Lopez
  • Sonja Lyubomirsky
  • Carol Dweck
  • Dacher Keltner
  • George Vaillant
  • Amy Wrzesniewski

Online Assessments (free)

Take free questionnaires at Dr. Seligman’s website to assess your:

  • Top Character Strengths (VIA Survey of Character Strengths Questionnaire)
  • Optimism
  • Gratitude
  • Grit
  • Meaning in Life
  • Close Relationships
  • Depressions (CES-D)
    and many more

 

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Can You Learn Hope and Optimism?Can You Learn Hope and Optimism?

Research clearly indicates that even the most die-hard pessimist can learn, using CBT, to use an optimistic explanatory style … and reap the benefits of a longer, healthier, and more satisfying life.

Summary

Research clearly indicates that even the most die-hard pessimist can learn, using CBT, to use an optimistic explanatory style … and reap the benefits of a longer, healthier, and more satisfying life.

The 3 P’s of Learned Optimism

An intersection between CBT and Positive Therapy is translating Seligman’s research in learned optimism. In therapy, we work on how to manage the  3 P’s of a pessimistic explanatory style. How do you explain setbacks to yourself?

Permanence:  An optimist will explain a negative event as temporary; a pessimist will see it as permanent.

Pervasiveness:  An optimist will specify that a failure is specific to particular conditions; a pessimist will see a failure in life as being a total failure in all of life.

Personal:  An optimist will take responsibility for a failure, in context to all the other contributors to it; a pessimist will blame himself without that other context.

For more details about the research behind ‘Learned Optimism’ check out Dr. Seligman’s book.

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Performance enhancing beliefsPerformance enhancing beliefs

People who have a ‘growth mindset’ (instead of a ‘fixed mindset’) achieve their goals and perform better, according to Dr. Carol Dweck of Stanford University. In these videos, she explains the power of believing, “I’m not there … yet… what do I need to do next?”

Summary

People who have a ‘growth mindset’ (instead of a ‘fixed mindset’) achieve their goals and perform better, according to Dr. Carol Dweck of Stanford University. In these videos, she explains the power of believing, “I’m not there … yet… what do I need to do next?”

Growth v. Fixed Mindset

The following videos can help you understand why you may be giving up too soon and how to not do so … when you are trying to reach your goals … in your career … with your relationships … even with recreational activities. In addition to these videos, you might also want to read how Dr. Dweck explains that people have misunderstood the concept – or people who have a <a href=”https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2016/12/how-praise-became-a-consolation-prize/510845/”>pseudo-Growth Mindset</a>.

 

 

 

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The Best on Stress & Stress ManagementThe Best on Stress & Stress Management

For 25 years, I’ve provided brief & time-limited, goal-directed & structured psychotherapies (with individual adults) that are scientifically proven to work.  The following are short descriptions of these therapies.

Summary

For 25 years, I’ve provided brief & time-limited, goal-directed & structured psychotherapies (with individual adults) that are scientifically proven to work.  The following are short descriptions of these therapies.

Please ‘share’ this post that I will continue to update with my ‘favorites’ related to stress and its management.

The Science on Stress

Stress, Portrait of a Killer

National Geographic showcases the best stress researchers. (Have patience with a few brief audio glitches)

Neuroscience Connections:  Emotion, Memory & Stress

If you’re interested to understand how a stressor (e.g., a move, a divorce, an unexpected car horn) gets under your skin and affects different people differently, then I highly recommend reading this blog post that spotlights Dr. Sternberg’s insights.

The Science on Stress Management

90:10 – The Single Most Important Thing YOU CAN DO For Your Stress

Watch this 10-minute video to learn how cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) applies to stress management. See more ‘healthy viral’ messages at Dr. Mike Evans’s Youtube Channel.

Coping with Stress:  Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Reduction

For a much more complete understanding of how we use CBT to manage stress, depression, and pessimism, I recommend  this excellent video (1 hour and 19 minutes) provided by Associate Professor Satterfield at the University of California, San Francisco.

Best Research on Preventing & REVERSING Stress-related Diseases

( I recommend subscribing to Dr. Ornish’s newsletter)

BEST Book (and program) on Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

I recommend that you read the “Introduction to the Second Edition” of Full Catastrophe Living by Jon Kabat Zinn  (free on Amazon, click on ‘Look Inside’ the book). You might also be interested in looking into MBSR classes in your zip code.

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CBT for Anxiety and DepressionCBT for Anxiety and Depression

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is the most extensively studied (and most effective) type of therapy for anxiety and depression.  Watch this video, by one of the foremost leaders in CBT, explaining how CBT works for both conditions.

Dennis Greenberger, PhD, addresses the differences and similarities between symptoms of anxiety and depression, how the disorders are treated with CBT, and what patients can expect in treatment.

Summary

Dennis Greenberger, PhD, addresses the differences and similarities between symptoms of anxiety and depression, how the disorders are treated with CBT, and what patients can expect in treatment.

How CBT treats Anxiety and Depression

This webinar is an educational presentation, offered by the ADAA (Anxiety & Depression Association of America), of which I am a member. I recommend beginning at minute “4” and after minute “39” there’s an optional Q & A period.

 

More Resources

I also belong to the Association for Behavioral & Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) which provides excellent CBT ‘Fact Sheets’ for Anxiety Disorders, including:

  • Panic Disorder
  • Social Phobia
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Specific Phobias
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

I highly recommend the CBT Fact Sheet for Depression as well.

 

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Fibromyalgia (FM)Fibromyalgia (FM)

Understand the state-of-the-art treatment for Fibromyalgia (FM). Below you will find excellent videos as well as a link to the best self-help tool for CBT for Fibromyalgia.

Summary

Understand the state-of-the-art treatment for Fibromyalgia (FM). Below you will find excellent videos as well as a link to the best self-help tool for CBT for Fibromyalgia.

Understanding Fibromyalgia (FM)

Dan Clauw, MD is the Director of the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center at the University of Michigan as well as Professor of Anesthesiology, Medicine (Rheumatology), and Psychiatry. As a leader in Fibromyalgia research, he explains the current understanding and best practices for treating Fibromyalgia and related conditions.

Dr. Clauw’s multidisciplinary team has extensively studied the use of CBT and exercise in context to Fibromyalgia and discusses his findings (in plain language).

Cannabinoids & Opioids for FM

 

Depression, FM, & Centralized Pain

Depression is common among chronic pain and Fibromyalgia. However, it’s also important to pay attention to what Dr. Clauw calls the 800 pound gorilla in chronic pain – centralized pain – which he believes will be a primary focus of the future of pain research and treatment.

Computer-based (free) CBT for FM

Dr. Clauw’s research team, including pain psychologist David Williams, PhD, developed an online self-paced version of CBT for Fibromyalgia. If you would like to try a do-it-yourself approach to CBT, this is a wonderful first step.  Go to FibroGuide.  I was part of the clinical research team (when it was based at Georgetown University) that tested an earlier, face-to-face version of CBT modules for FM.

Understanding Pain 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Find CBT-trained Therapists

If self-help is not enough, contact me at drcary@mac.com or look for CBT providers in the CBT Directory for providers near you. Also, many providers will conduct CBT using teleconferencing.

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CBT-I for Chronic Insomnia 1CBT-I for Chronic Insomnia

Ads say, “Ask your doctor” for a pill. But, in fact, sleep specialists say that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) is the FIRST step to take … before any kind of medication.

Summary

Ads say, “Ask your doctor” for a pill. But, in fact, sleep specialists say that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) is the FIRST step to take … before any kind of medication.

How much sleep do you need?

Joint Consensus Statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society on the Recommended Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Adult: Methodology and Discussion
Nathaniel F. Watson et al
Sleep Research Society | 2015

Consensus Statement

  • Adults should sleep 7 or more hours per night on a regular basis to promote optimal health.

    • Sleeping less than 7 hours per night on a regular basis is associated with adverse health outcomes, including weight gain and obesity, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke, depression, and increased risk of death. Sleeping less than 7 hours per night is also associated with impaired immune function, increased pain, impaired performance, increased errors, and greater risk of accidents.
    • Sleeping more than 9 hours per night on a regular basis may be appropriate for young adults, individuals recovering from sleep debt, and individuals with illnesses. For others, it is uncertain whether sleeping more than 9 hours per night is associated with health risk.
    • People concerned they are sleeping too little or too much should consult their healthcare provider.

The American College of Physicians Recommendation

Management of Chronic Insomnia Disorder in Adults: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians
Amir Qaseem, MD et al
Annals of Internal Medicine | July 19, 2016

What does CBT-I look like?

This video, produced by psychologists – CBT-I specialists – realistically explains (and shows) the most essential parts of what to expect in CBT-I treatment.

The sleep diary

DOWNLOAD the Sleep Diary + the Instructions here!

The consensus sleep diary: standardizing prospective sleep self-monitoring
Carney, CE et al
Sleep | Sleep Research Society | Volume 35 Issue 02

Abstract
Study Objectives:
To present an expert consensus, standardized, patient-informed sleep diary.

Conclusions:
The Consensus Sleep Diary was the result of collaborations with insomnia experts and potential users. The adoption of a standard sleep diary for insomnia will facilitate comparisons across studies and advance the field. The proposed diary is intended as a living document which still needs to be tested, refined, and validated.

 

Does computer-based CBT-I work?

Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Cheng, SK and Dizon, J
Psychotherapy and Psychomatics | June 2012

Abstract

Background: Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (CCBT) is an innovative mode of delivering services to patients with psychological disorders. The present paper uses a meta-analysis to systematically review and evaluate the effectiveness of CCBT for insomnia (CCBT-I).

Method: A comprehensive search was conducted on 7 databases including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Social Sciences Citation Index and PubMed (up to March 2011). Search terms covered 3 concepts: (1) [internet, web, online, computer-aided, computer-assisted, computer-guided, computerized OR computerised] AND (2) [CBT, cognitive therapy, behavio(u)ral therapy OR behavio(u)r therapy] AND (3) [insomnia, sleep disorders OR sleeping problem].

Results: 533 potentially relevant papers were identified, and 6 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that met the selection criteria were included in the review and analysis. Two RCTs were done by the same group of investigators (Ritterband and colleagues) using the same internet programmes. Post-treatment mean differences between groups showed that the effects of CCBT-I on sleep quality, sleep efficiency, the number of awakenings, sleep onset latency and the Insomnia Severity Index were significant, ranging from small to large effect sizes. However, effects on wake time after sleep onset, total sleep time and time in bed were non-significant. On average, the number needed to treat was 3.59. The treatment adherence rate for CCBT-I was high (78%).

Conclusion: The results lend support to CCBT as a mildly to moderately effective self-help therapy in the short run for insomnia. CCBT-I can be an acceptable form of low-intensity treatment in the stepped care model for insomnia.

Best complementary health approaches

The National Center for Compelementary and Intregrative Health, a National Institute of Health (NIH), clearly states what IS and IS NOT proven to help insomnia on this page.  Briefly, they cover:

  • Mind/Body techniques, such as: relaxation, meditation, hypnotherapy, yoga, and acupuncture.
  • Supplements, such as:  melatonin, chamomile, cava, valerian, L-Trytophan, 5-HTP, lemon balm, passionflower, or hops.
  • Other remedies, such as:  Aromatherapy, Homeopathic medicine.

Measuring activity while asleep

Practice Parameters for the Use of Actigraphy in the Assessment of Sleep and Sleep Disorders: An Update for 2007
American Academy of Sleep Medicine | April 2007

Measure the Quality of your Care

Measurement of Quality to Improve Care in Sleep Medicine
Timothy Morgenthaler, MD et al
Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine | Volume 12 Number 8

Abstract

The Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Task Force to develop quality measures as part of its strategic plan to promote high quality patient-centered care. Among many potential dimensions of quality, the AASM requested Workgroups to develop outcome and process measures to aid in evaluating the quality of care of five common sleep disorders: restless legs syndrome, insomnia, narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea in adults, and obstructive sleep apnea in children. This paper describes the rationale, background, general methods development, and considerations in implementation for these sleep disorder quality measures.

The Workgroup papers are published in this issue under the following titles: Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome, Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Insomnia, Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Narcolepsy, Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Quality Measures for the Care of Pediatric Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

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Auto Draft 5Learning to Manage Stress

Daily stress is an unavoidable part of daily life. It’s how you manage the stress that’s most important.

Summary

Daily stress is an unavoidable part of daily life. It’s how you manage the stress that’s most important.

The Stress Response

 

Learning to Manage Stress 2Using Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), you will learn how to relax both your mind and body.

First, let’s think about how to relax your body.

When we’re upset – the stress response automatically kicks in (the sympathetic nervous system).

Daily stress creates wear & tear on all of us and can worsen  medical illnesses.  For that reason, we all need to learn to manage stress really well! We may not be able to stop stressful situations from happening … but, we can learn to manage our reaction to stress — in the moment.

The beauty of your body is that you can literally take control of your stress response (even in most stressful situations) by paying more attention to your breathing than to how stressed you feel!

The Relaxation Response

Learning to Manage Stress 3Learning to Manage Stress 4The first step is to be mindful in the moment that you’re feeling stressed! Watch a few great Mindfulness technique demonstrations here.

The next step is to learn how to reduce your stress response …. just by using a simple breathing technique.

If you breathe slowly (approximately 6.5 breathes per minute) and take a little more time on the exhale (4 seconds per inhale; 5 or 6 seconds per exhale), then you will turn on the ‘relaxation response’ (parasympathetic nervous system).

The below videos will teach and demonstrate for you exactly how to do that slow belly breathing. It takes a little practice … everyone can learn to do it in time!

How to Belly Breathe

Watch Dr. Carbonell demonstrate belly breathing

 

If you like apps, I recommend using the FREE Breath2Relax app … This video (which includes 4 short mini-videos) previews components of the app, which was developed by the Department of Defense.

 

Techniques (if your brain is too ‘busy’ to relax)

There are two science-based techniques that work really well, especially if you feel too antsy to just do the breathing:

  1. Progressive Muscle Relaxation
  2. Visual Imagery

Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR)

Below are two guided practices. The first is shorter, has a male voice, and shows you the muscle groups. The second is longer, has a female voice, calm music in the background. Get a sense of the kind of guide you prefer. Finally, take some time to make it your own exercise. Pick from a wide variety – now that you know what the basic elements are:

  1. Systematically switch from muscle tensing to relaxing
  2. Notice the deeper relaxation in each area by way of contrast from tension
  3. Rhythmically simplify instructions
  4. Notice the deeper relaxation upon exhaling – the exhale turns ON the relaxation response!

Shorter version (6 minutes)

Longer version (15 minutes)

Visual Imagery (a misnomer!)

Below are two guided practices: (1) a beach scene, and (2) a woods scene. It doesn’t matter where you take yourself (think of it like a mini-vacation in your mind). In fact, some people prefer sheer magical fantasy, like being in a Disneyland of their own.

It’s a misnomer because the important thing is to pay attention to using ALL your senses: see the sights, as you hear the sounds, as you touch the textures, as you smell the fragrances, as you savor the tastes.   The goal is to be IN the experience … rather than just see it. Fill it with your own personalized memories of pleasant feelings and smells and bring in anything that is calming to you, like a special warm loving hug.

Take some time to find your own preferred imagery … with some ideas from this variety of imagery videos.

Beach

Woods

Brief Grounding (calming) Techniques

Sometimes we feel way too keyed up to even begin a relaxation session (breathing, PMR, or visual imagery). Whenever you feel overly stressed (over a ‘5’ out of ’10’), it’s a good idea to try one of several very brief  behavioral techniques to bring yourself to a calmer state.  They’re called ‘grounding’ techniques because they’re simply meant to get you more in touch with feeling safe and secure – in the ‘here & now’ rather than thinking about the past or worrying about the future.

I recommend trying several, to find one that can become your go-to quick rescue.  These videos explain how to use your senses to get grounded right away, how to create your own safe place, how to count your breaths, and even how to use yawning to access a calmer state.

Best of all worlds, you will practice doing one of these daily so that you will be skillful … whenever you really need to pull this ‘relaxation’ skill out of your mental health toolkit – on your demand to calm yourself.

 

 

 

 

Calming Yourself (fast) from High Stress

Yes, there’s a proven technique to manage high stress fast. Dr. Ali Mattu explains/demonstrates this in his video. You can achieve the same response by putting a frozen washcloth on your forehead.

NOTE:  Don’t try this without consulting your physician first – especially if you have any type of heart disease!

 

Well-Being is a Skill

Modern neuroscience teaches that we can train our brains to have more well-being; it’s a skill to learn. Watch a thought-leader in the field of neuropsychology, Dr. Davidson, talk in Part I … about the science of well-being and in Part II … the 4 constituents of well-being, including the importance of practicing mindfulness.

 

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